BSJ

The Butler Scholarly Journal

Category: Uncategorized

  1. Butler Talk: Broadcasting the News, Reflecting our Communities

    As part of the college’s Butler Talks, ITV correspondent Helen Ford visited the college in early November. ITV regularly holds their diversity panel, run by Helen, which is made up of members of the public and Josephine Butler students. Thus, the topic of representing diversity in television formed the majority of the talk. After a small drinks reception in the SCR, students and staff were led to the seminar room for Helen’s fascinating talk. The discussion highlighted the potential difficulties and possible solutions when attempting to fairly depict diversity in television. The attempt to show diversity in news reports seemed…

  2. ‘Grand de Party’: Did the Tour de France benefit Yorkshire?

    Portrayed as the ‘grandest départ’ in the Tour’s history, the Tour de France’s visit to Yorkshire was claimed to be an economic opportunity to showcase its thriving cities and scenic routes, yet its role as a regional invigorator has been questioned. In addition to short term road closures and travel disruption, the economic cost of preparing the route and the environmental impact of the event may undermine the value of its benefits to the region. The economic return from the Tour may be vast, with estimates of over £100 million for the region (Coldrick, 2013). This may be long term,…

  3. Who was Josephine Butler? A social reformer? A pioneer? A forgotten saint?

    As students, staff and friends of Josephine Butler College, I wonder how many times we have heard the words ‘our claim, is a claim for the rights of all’ at the end of every formal, and not fully considered the depth of meaning behind their use. When the opportunity to attend the lecture delivered by Dr. Helen Mathers arose at the beginning of the year, it appeared to be an invitation not to be missed. As members of the Butler community, it is important to consider the work, beliefs and values of the person our college is named after, and…

  4. Colonisation of Mars: is it really possible?

    Walking on the moon is arguably one of the greatest achievements of mankind, but as the Apollo 17 mission in 1972 was the last landing of humans on Earth’s natural satellite, it is evident our attention has been focused elsewhere. In 2011, Bas Lansdorp and Arno Wielders changed the direction of space travel by announcing the Mars One mission, which aims to colonise Mars with human life by 2025. The mission began with a selection process in 2013, where any individual over the age of 18 could apply. There were over 200,000 applicants, all of whom wanted to be among…

  5. Do we really want a ‘UKIP of the left’?

    Following Douglas Carswell’s victory in the Clacton by-election (with an astonishing 59.7%), more serious questions are being raised about the legitimacy of UKIP’s threat to the three core parties in Britain. UKIP is incontrovertibly developing as an established figure in British politics with its mild successes in the May 2014 European elections and more recently, their first ever elected MP. With many right-leaning voters struggling to distinguish between Labour, Conservatives, and Liberal Democrats, UKIP is offering a viable alternative. So, as many writers have asked, why isn’t there the option of a ‘UKIP of the left?’ Personally, I wouldn’t vote…

  6. An interview with Lauriane Povey

    Butler’s own Lauriane Povey became a published author at the age of 15 with her debut novel Living a Nightmare. She has since published a second book, Veil of Anonymity. The Butler Scholarly Journal met with Lauriane to discuss her writing and her future prospects. Could you tell us a little about your first two books and their genre? What attracted you to this genre? My first two books, Living a Nightmare and Veil of Anonymity are young adult novels. Living a Nightmare is about a 13 year old girl who has dreams about the past, present and future and…

  7. La France en crise

    Alexis de Toqueville once wrote of France, “Has there ever been any nation on earth which was so full of contrasts, and so extreme in all of its acts, more dominated by emotions, and less by principles; always doing better or worse than we expect, sometimes below the common level of humanity, sometimes much above it.” The tale of François Hollande as president is extreme, emotional and overwhelmingly negative. Hollande’s economic programme has been a big volte-face, illustrated in the replacement of left-wing finance minister, Arnaud Montebourg. Montebourg described the efforts to reduce budget deficits in the Eurozone as Kafkaesque,…

  8. War Monuments, Memorialisation and Forgetting

    ‘The postmodern age is obsessed with memory’ (Sherman, 1999: 1) Memorial monuments and war monuments in particular have become increasingly ubiquitous over the last two centuries. An emphasis has been placed on making sure that every event is remembered, and remembered in the correct way. In this time, the study of memorialisation and monuments has also flourished and on the eve of the 100 year anniversary of the First World War this discussion is still alive and well. With Michael Gove continuing to squabble with ministers and academics over the ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ ways in which the war is remembered…

  9. HIV Stigma: The Importance of Talking About Sex

    When we think about HIV, what may immediately springs to mind is the situation in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the infection is spreading dramatically. Most of us will be aware of the devastating situation there, with extreme death rates and only a small percentage of people aware that they have the infection. Though rates of infection have dropped, around 1.2 million people in the area are dying each year, which is still an alarming and tragic statistic. This seems a world away from the situation in the UK and much of the Western world, where HIV has been controlled much better….

  10. Debate: Should Scotland become an independent country?

    Scotland has been part of the United Kingdom since 1707. On 18th September 2014, citizens will have the chance to vote on whether Scotland should become an independent country in its own right, but opinions on the subject are polarised. Here, two Butlerites present either side of the argument for Scottish independence, a debate which has divided the nation. Yes: Kieran Devlin explores the reasons why Scotland should become independent… In this conflict of sneering demonising and contrived one-upmanship, where one “camp’s” mantra is fundamentally petulant fear-mongering, and the other’s fundamentally naïve uber-nationalism; rationality and objectivity is a myth. It’s…