BSJ

The Butler Scholarly Journal

Category: Uncategorized

  1. Longing for “Home”: A Critical View of Asylum Seekers.

    “I long for home, long for the sight of home.” – The Odyssey, Homer At the core of our collective imaginary, lays the image of the exile and their transformative journey in search of a place that can offer some type of emotional and spiritual stability; a place we call, often not sure of what we mean, “home”. Whether it be Odysseus battling against the inclement Aegean Sea or Moses leading his people across the never-ending Sinai, our culture appears to be obsessed with the expatriate, that person who inhabits the “liminal”, who is neither here nor there. Forced migration…

  2. Interview: The Lion and the Lamb

    John Henry Clay is a novelist and lecturer in medieval history at Durham University. The Butler Scholarly Journal caught up with him to discuss his highly acclaimed debut novel, The Lion and the Lamb (July 2013). The Butler Scholarly Journal: What drew you to mid-4th century Roman Britain as a setting for your first novel, The Lion and the Lamb? John Henry Clay: I first came across the period as an archaeology undergraduate, and something about it caught my imagination. It was the ‘Golden Age’ of Roman Britain, a world of palatial country villas and bustling cities, with a highly…

  3. Fashion Debate Part 2: Fashion as an outlet for big ideas

    ‘Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening’ – Coco Chanel (cited in Madsen, 1991). ‘Hussein Chalayan is a politically engaged designer whose view of fashion succeeds in awakening an awareness of the challenges facing our civilisation’ – Visitor’s Guide to ‘Hussein Chalayan: Fashion Narratives’ (Le Musée de la Mode et du Textile Exposition, 2011). In many ways, despite its adversaries, fashion is an outlet for ideas, and big ideas at that. Although it can be a product…

  4. Careers: A graduate scheme in renewable energy

    It was long assumed by others (and for a time, me included) that I was destined for a career in the financial services. If you look at the two years I spent as Junior Common Room treasurer, the four years I spent mastering mathematics and the accountancy internship I did the summer after my third year at university, the evidence quickly stacks up. However, it was during said internship that I discovered I really wasn’t suited for the industry. Since I wasn’t interested in teaching I felt, as a future maths graduate, the options open to me were now incredibly…

  5. Mitigating Armageddon

    On the morning of the 15th of February 2013 at about 09:20 local time, the sky above the Russian town of Chelyabinsk – nearly 2000km east of Moscow and just north of the border with Kazakhstan – was rent asunder by a bright flash of light and shockwave of sound. There had been a huge explosion at an altitude of about 76,000 feet and on a scale of about 20-30 times that of the nuclear fission bomb that was exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. A superbolide with a mass of between 12,000 and 13,000 metric tonnes (about 20m in diameter)…

  6. The Roma Community: Prejudices and Inequalities

    The Roma people, a group that rarely enters the public consciousness in the UK, have hit international headlines over the past couple of weeks. It all started with “Maria”, the blond-haired, blue-eyed four-year-old girl in Greece who was taken away from her dark-complexioned Roma family by the police, largely on the basis that she couldn’t possibly be their biological child as she looked so different – and if she wasn’t their biological child, they must have kidnapped her. Maria was put into the care of an NGO while police carried out DNA tests, which confirmed that she was not biologically…

  7. Careers: Tips on making it in Journalism

    Before, during and after university I asked a lot of people about how to get into journalism, all of whom came back with different answers. But the main message was always the same – it’s an impossible career to get into. It isn’t. This negative message seems to be echoed in the picture the media paints of itself too; that job opportunities are gold dust and that knowing someone in the industry is the only way in. This isn’t true either. It was enough to drive me away from a journalism degree, and instead I resigned myself to the prison…

  8. Fashion Debate Part 1: The fashion industry and the ‘image’

    ‘Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months’ – Oscar Wilde (cited in Esar, 1949). ‘Anyone who regularly contemplates clothing for more than five minutes a week is wasting their life as surely as the most lethargic, do-nothing heroin addict imaginable’ – Charlie Brooker (2007). Fashion has long been criticised for being vain and superficial. In more recent debates about size zero models, however, the industry has also been discredited for undermining women’s self-confidence and health. Liz Jones, who resigned as editor of Marie Claire in 2001 due to her failed…

  9. Say No to Rhino Horn

    Rhino poaching has become an ever increasing problem over the past few years. Since 2008 cases of rhino poaching, especially in South Africa which contains 80% of all of Africa’s rhinos, have increased dramatically. 2011 saw 448 cases of poaching in South Africa, indicating an increase of 3000% since 2007. 668 rhinos were killed in the country in 2012 and the number is set to be even higher for this year. This is obviously devastating news for the rhinos of Africa, especially black rhinos, which are already critically endangered in the wild. If poaching on this scale continues, we face…

  10. Fracking Hell

    Hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks and release natural gas or oil. Fractures provide a conductive path connecting a larger volume of the reservoir to the well. Some hydraulic fractures form naturally, such as veins or dykes, and can create conduits along which gas and petroleum from source rocks may migrate to reservoir rocks. Induced hydraulic fracturing (fracking) enables the production of natural gas and oil from rock formations at depths of up to 20000ft, where there may not be sufficient…